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With the new AMG Track Pace feature, you can analyze your driving style in detail. We tested the assistant on the racetrack in Portimão — in a Mercedes-AMG E 63 S 4MATIC+. With Karl Wendlinger at the wheel. AAs we cross the finish line, we’re going considerably more than 240 km/h. At the end of the straight, we hit the 402-mm-diameter ceramic disc brakes at just shy of 270 km/h. And yet COMAND displays a lap time that surprises Karl Wendlinger. Bright red, noticeably slower than his fastest lap here in Portimão today. What’s the cause? Maybe Wendlinger, the ex-Formula 1 driver and now instructor and brand ambassador for Mercedes-AMG, was too busy talking to me. About the track as a whole, in detail; about breakpoints and places where you can make up lost time. Wendlinger is irritated and shifts into attack mode. He resolutely moves the DYNAMIC SELECT controller from “Sport” to “RACE”. The Mercedes-AMG E 63 S 4MATIC+ noticeably braces itself. The sound of its 612-hp, eight-cylinder, biturbo engine rumbles more deeply, hammering deep into our eardrums with a force that gives us goosebumps. Accompanied by the fanfare of the dual clutch when downshifting, we now enter the narrow right turn after the home stretch, mercilessly pressed by our seatbelts. The braking performance of the Mercedes-AMG E 63 S 4MATIC+ literally robs you of breath. The cockpit indicates a braking force of 0.7 g; Mercedes-AMG partner Michelin developed the ultra-high-performance MICHELIN Pilot Sport 4 S tires especially for this model. Wendlinger laughs — the time for the first section has turned green. “There you are,” he says, unable to help himself. The AMG brand ambassador manages the rest of the lap easily, ekes just a little bit more out of a few places. On crossing the finish line, the COMAND display shows us everything is fine. More than fine. Wendlinger laughs contentedly. “Simply displaying the completed lap times is the most basic implementation of the new AMG Track Pace feature. It’s actually a proper telemetry unit like the kind used in motorsports.” Telemetry stands for the transfer of measured data from a sensor to a spatially separated receiving point. This type of long-range measurement was first used in aviation in order to monitor rocket engines. In the beginning of the 1970s, the first systems of this kind were implemented in the command consoles in motorsport pit lanes. With eight recording channels, only a few variables could be monitored at the outset, and furthermore, there was no ability to save the data. It was printed in real time on a continuous roll of paper. “It generated as much as 100 feet or more per lap,” says Wendlinger. OOnly when you’re able to comprehend how the automobile responds to your input, where there’s still room for improvement and at which points you can proceed a little more delicately, can you get really fast,” says Wendlinger as he lets the Mercedes-AMG E 63 S 4MATIC+ coast into the pit lane. “Of course, these days in motorsports you have a whole army of data-processing engineers who can help you break down every detail so you can push yourself and the car to the absolute limit,” he continues. “But what really impressed me was how the engineers 71


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