Page 30

gtr_amg_magazin_eng

behind in a three-star restaurant.” That afternoon at the restaurant Le Pavillon, she already had a pea soup with poached egg, a lilywhite piece of steamed cod over ratatouille and afterwards a classic floating island with strawberries and rhubarb. How can anyone 67 inches tall maintain a weight of 132 pounds when eating such first-class comestibles? “By not eating between meals. If I’m at a gas station and see a chocolate bar, it doesn’t tempt me at all when I’ve just eaten a sublime chocolate dessert!” Furthermore, there are the long days. An evening in a top restaurant rarely ends before 10:30 pm. F For M., the days begin in the morning before breakfast (double espresso, honey bread) with the report of the previous evening. In her hotel room she meticulously documents her impressions of the dinner in a journal— Arial, 9-point font—dish for dish, every ingredient, every detail, every method of preparation is reconsidered and ultimately rated. Even if it is not taken into account when awarding stars, as inspectors only evaluate the quality of a cuisine, she also takes note of the service from the greeting to the good-bye, the wine list, the décor of the restaurant. After checkout, the hotel inspection is on the agenda for midmorning, and eventually perhaps an unannounced visit for a preliminary talk at a possible new entry in the guide. Lunch follows, then more report writing, hotel check-in, dinner. And all over again the next day – three weeks at a time, always in a different region across the whole of Europe. And tomorrow? “I’m off tomorrow,” says M. She takes another canelé and doesn’t look unhappy. B Before returning to Germany, she will write her report, inspect the hotel and then, after three days, six meals and three hotel tests in Champagne, she will still take the time—a great private luxury—to buy a case of champagne, Rosé de Réserve, at G. Tribaut in Hautvillers. Where will she eat? “With a friend tomorrow evening.” And what? A brief hesitation. And then with a smile: “In my case, probably around the corner in a brewery pub: meatloaf with fried egg and fried potatoes!” Awards and symbols of the MICHELIN Guide Assiette MICHELIN Inclusion in the guide alone is a distinction. The “Assiette Michelin” is awarded to all restaurants that have been visited by Michelin inspectors and deemed advisable. Bib Gourmand Here you can get a tasty and carefully prepared three-course meal without drinks at an affordable price (price varies depending on the country). 1 star A kitchen full of refinement – “worth a stop”. Products of special quality, unmistakable refinement on the plate, taste that’s right on the mark, a consistently high level of cooking. 2 stars Excellent cooking, “worth a detour”. Outstanding products, admirably presented by a talented chef and his team with a great deal of expertise and inspiration in subtle, unusual and occasionally original creations. 3 stars An exceptional cuisine – “worth a special journey”. The hand of a great chef! First-class, top-quality products, pure and intense aromas, harmonious compositions: Here is where cooking becomes an art. Perfectly prepared dishes that are often destined to become classics. The above ratings apply exclusively to the culinary performance. If you want to know something about the atmosphere and the service in the restaurant, pay attention to the fork and spoon. Things are therefore fuss-free in a restaurant with one fork and spoon; the service is casual. In a restaurant with four or five forks and spoons, a large service team takes care of the guests; there is a sommelier, elegant dishes and cutlery, and so forth. The MICHELIN Guide uses red labels to place particular emphasis on the best and most enjoyable locations in their category. 26


gtr_amg_magazin_eng
To see the actual publication please follow the link above