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DPM: Mr. Moers, Mercedes-AMG entered a new market segment with the Mercedes-AMG GT. Would you already speak of a success story? Tobias Moers: Yes, absolutely. We were really thrilled by the sensational success of the GT in the German market. A new sports car has to rigorously earn its merits. But today we aren’t only where we wanted to be with the AMG GT – we’re already much further along. Although that’s not a phenomenon limited to the German market. The GT was well received in other markets too. DPM: In June, the Mercedes-AMG GT R —currently the most powerful production version of the GT—celebrated its debut at the Goodwood Festival of Speed, with Lewis Hamilton taking the first laps. What can AMG aficionados expect from this car? TM: The GT R is the athletic flagship model of the GT family, inspired directly by racing. Compared to the GT S, not only is the engine of the GT R completely retuned and noticeably more powerful, we also have active aerodynamic features on the front: A radiator shutter in the new Panamericana grille controls the balance between low air resistance and maximum ventilation of the engine compartment. The active aerodynamic profile—an underbody panelling that can be variably moved downward— delivers tremendous surface pressure in conjunction with the rear wing. The suspension benefits from the active rear-axle steering – and then there are the numerous lightweight components such as the carbon front wings, front and rear aprons made of carbon fiber. DPM: With the active rear-axle steering you’ve assembled a very innovative technology package. What does it mean for the GT R driver? TM: Correct, we’ve put a lot of time and care into the active rear-axle steering. In tight corners the manoeuvrability and responsiveness of the GT R are drastically increased through the rear axle steering against the front wheels by only a few degrees. By contrast, in fast corners or high-speed manoeuvers, the rear axle steers ever so slightly with the front wheels, thus ensuring an TM: Absolutely, and we’re constantly expanding the palette. The compact models with the turbocharged four-cylinder are very powerful. Their driving dynamics are unbelievably high on account of the uncompromisingly sporty 4MATIC all-wheel drive. At the same time, in terms of engine performance, we’re moving into the output-per-liter range of a purebred superbike. Do we want the next generation to be even better in this regard? I’d say yes! DPM: The powerful biturbo V6 engines have been in the Mercedes-AMG 43 models for a year. What can we expect from this series? TM: The 43 series defines the AMG brand in the sports segment very strongly and is very competitive there. The Mercedes-AMG C 43 is a sensation. We’re already looking forward to the GLC 43 models, and if you’ve already had the chance to drive an SLC 43, which will be a very different car on account of its forceful V6 and its delightfully crisp engine sound, you’ll understand intuitively what role the six-cylinder of the 43 line can play for AMG in the future. DPM: The 63 models remain the centerpiece of AMG – whether it’s the four-liter V8 or the 5.5-liter V8. But what about the large twelve-cylinder? TM: Of course, V12 performance is attainable even in an eight-cylinder, but at AMG it’s ultimately about emotion. Our twelve-cylinder customers are very demanding. They love that engine, and for them no other will do. So we’ll stick with it, but we obviously need to think about how we shape this concept in the future. But you may be sure that we’ve already developed one idea or another along these lines. DPM: You broached the subject of the future: Many manufacturers will increasingly focus on electric engines in the coming years. Will AMG as a performance brand uncompromisingly go along with them? TM: What do you mean by “go along with”? With the SLS AMG Electric Drive we set the benchmark in terms of electric Driving Performance. And when I look at the model strategy of our incredible level of stability. With this technology in the AMG GT R, you can take the most exacting stretches on the Nürburgring Nordschleife noticeably faster than without active rear-axle steering. DPM: “AMG Traction Control” is the magic word that causes your engineers’ eyes to light up. Can you tell us more? TM: Internally that’s what we call the 9-mode traction control in the AMG GT R, a technology we derived straight from the GT3 racer. Between off, minimal intervention and drastic traction control, every nuance can be finely controlled by the driver using a small rotary knob. Even veteran circuit racers get an unprecedented degree of precisely metered traction. If, for example, you think of our placing first through fourth in the 24-hour race at the Nürburgring, which the Mercedes-AMG GT3 was impressively able to sweep under challenging weather conditions – that’s exactly where these kinds of individually controllable traction controls are used, and the GT R transfers this racing technology to the street. DPM: And what’s the story behind the name “Green Hell magno” for the paint color? TM: The GT R was developed on the Nürburgring, “The Green Hell”. It was here, as I mentioned, that the GT3 racing version enjoyed great success in endurance racing. The Green Hell is also the natural habitat for the GT R. And when you’re driving on the Nordschleife, new impressions, new challenges, new discoveries emerge at every turn, even for experienced drivers. The Green Hell is a relentless teacher. It doesn’t let you off the hook. It doesn’t give you a breather. That is also precisely the spirit in which we developed the AMG GT R: To always become better, to never sit back, to accept and overcome challenges. Then this gorgeous, semi-gloss coating emerged in a rather casual green. The rest is history. DPM: Then let’s talk about engines in general. Today AMG has a wide range of engines – from the turbocharged four-cylinder up to the V12. Tell me, will you continue to retain that impressive engine range in the years to come? 12


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