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High above Los Angeles winds the asphalt ribbon named after engineer William Mulholland. We have felt the energy of this unique pass — in the new Mercedes-AMG GLE 63 S Coupé T The Snake has struck a little further up. Its last victim turned around several times on its own axis before hitting the ground and remaining motionless. But potential victims have become more cautious; the asphalt snake’s warning has hit home – for the moment. Eventually, the drivers in their fast cars will once again underestimate what is perhaps the most dangerous curve in the world, and then it will snatch them. But this wickedness is also part of its appeal. Sunlight glistens on the scuffed steel guardrail just in front of The Snake – the most famous, most menacing curve in America. But to understand this dangerous stretch of asphalt, we need to wind this experience back to the beginning: We find ourselves near the southern tip of the City of Los Angeles. Pat Bolter extends his powerful hand towards us in goodbye. The 55-year-old general manager of Mercedes-Benz of Laguna Niguel bids us farewell from a golf caddy. The whirring electric vehicle has chauffeured us over the vast grounds of the California branch. And now there it is, the final destination of our bumpy ride with Pat: the new Mercedes-AMG GLE 63 S Coupé. “Look at this beauty,” enthuses Pat. “Have fun, guys! You’ll love America – with this set of wheels. And, hey, send pictures!” Of course, Pat! WWe head toward Malibu, from where the Pacific seems to virtually wash us into the Mulholland Highway. The asphalt ribbon careers over the rolling hills around Malibu and Santa Monica for nearly fifty miles until finally becoming Mulholland Drive. The two passes on this stretch are named after the same William Mulholland (an Irish engineer) who in the early 20th century first brought running water to L.A. and subsequently abundant growth. The further we go into the red-rock landscape of California, the less the cooling breeze of the Pacific can be felt. Up here, the thermometer climbs to almost 89 degrees Fahrenheit, around 32 degrees Celsius. However, the air emanating from the active seat ventilation elegantly mediates the difference in temperature between inside and outside. And in the occasionally tight curves, the turning circle thrills us: In spite of its ample dimensions, the car 28


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